What I want you to know about Tasha // A celebration of my sneaky and stubborn princess.

What I want you to know about Tasha // A celebration of my sneaky and stubborn princess. // Blog post and illustration by Asti @ atypicalnarrative

Last week I had to say goodbye to Tasha, my fifteen-and-a-half year old sneaky and stubborn princess who had been with me for as long as I’ve had my period. (If only I could’ve kept her and got rid of this bleeding-and-cramping every month thing instead.) While I sort of had an idea that her end was near (she never recovered from her partial ACL tear that occurred in March and my silly post about her gas last year even mentioned my realization that my time with her was limited), it didn’t make the experience of taking her to the vet one last time any easier and I continue to be racked with overwhelming amounts of sadness as I realize she’s gone for good. It will eventually pass (or at least become more bearable, I know), but for now it just sucks. I want my baby girl back. I don’t want that goodbye to be real.

That being said, I’m not here to wallow in self-pity (I prefer to do that in private). Instead, I want to use this post to celebrate the life and personality of Tasha. She wasn’t the best of dogs, but she was always true to herself, and I wouldn’t have wanted her any other way.

So please, if you have time to spare, join my celebrate of my sneaky and stubborn princess.
These are the things I want you to know about Tasha (and the things I hope I never forget):

Continue reading

Advertisements

Could you clench those cheeks together? // A(n unusual) letter to my old dog

Dear Tasha, could you clench those cheeks together? // A(n unusual) letter to my old dog // Blog post and illustration by Asti @ bit.ly/atypicalnarrative

Note: This post was originally published on my previous personal blog, Oh, Asti, on March 8, 2016. As that blog is no longer public and I (very sadly) had to say goodbye to my furry princess this past week, I decided I wanted to share it once again.

To me, it is fitting. Not only does it show that I’ve had my worries about Tasha’s health for a while, but it also highlights the fun, loving nature of our relationship (even if at times it involved some pleas for clean air). Being Tasha’s mom hasn’t been without its struggles over the years, but it was always worth and I wouldn’t change a thing.

Thursday’s post will be another dedicated to my dearly departed friend and then the blog should be back to its regular fun-filled content the following week. I thank you for your patience and understanding during this time. And for all you fur mommies out there – give your pet some extra loving from me today (even if it’s a cat, though I won’t like it as much). đź–¤

Continue reading

Is my dog a bitch or is she just deaf?

Is my dog a bitch or is she just deaf? || The struggles of having a deaf female dog. || Blog post and illustration by Asti @ atypicalnarrative

Yup, that was the question I had to ask myself a couple of years ago once I returned from studying abroad in London. My lovely chow/collie/retriever mix Tasha wasn’t as responsive as she used to be and I just couldn’t decide whether she was being a stubborn bitch, upset that I had left her for so long and flexing her HBIC muscles, or if her old age was finally catching up to her in the form of hearing loss.

It took me a month or two to come to a conclusion but in the end I figured it out: she’s actually a bit of both. My dog is a deaf bitch. Not only is she hard of hearing, but she likes to do what she wants.

(Oh, and hey, she is a female dog so she’s a bitch even on the technical level too. You can’t yell at me for using this word so much when it’s technical!)

Now being an owner of a deaf bitch isn’t too bad. For the most part she’s too lazy these days to get up to any trouble and we do a great job of communicating non-verbally. (There’s nothing like a sassy hands-on-the-hips pose to let a dog know she’s crossing the line.) The one area in which this has become a bit of a struggle though is bathroom breaks.

Continue reading